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How To Start A Cross Stitch Without A Knot

Getting beautiful results from cross stitches can be so fulfilling, even at beginner-level projects. But sometimes, while running your hands through the fabric, you may encounter knot-bumps at the start of the design.

These knots are usually a result of knotted ends at the beginning or end of the stitch-work, and they can be stressful to get rid of because you need to secure the start.

The best way to avoid knot-bumps while doing a cross stitch project is to start without a knot. If you are a beginner, then this probably sounds impossible.

On the other hand, if you are an experienced stitcher, you may have had some trouble securing a knotless cross-stitch and need some help to get it right.

Wondering about how to start a cross stitch without a knot? Keep reading!

How to Start a Cross Stitch without A knot

Threadwork can be really stunning when done right, but getting those perfect results comes with a lot of trial, error, and knots. One of the biggest problems that stitchers have when it comes to cross stitching is securing the start of the pattern.

Knots are the obvious option for securing any stitching or embroidery project. However, they can alter the outcome of hours’ worth of work, especially with those annoying bumps in the look or feel of the fabric.

What if you never had to deal with messy knots and could instead enjoy a flawless pattern production? Well, creativity is everything but there are two main methods you can use to start your cross stitch without a knot.

Method 1: Knotless Loops

The neatest way to start a cross stitch is a knotless loop. Though it can only be used for threadwork that requires an even number of strands for the threading, a knotless loop can help you achieve that flawless look.

Step 1: Measure and thread your needle

The most important part of using knotless loops for your cross stitch is ensuring that the thread count is even. This method can only work if you are using 2 or 4 strands for the threadwork.

Begin by measuring out half the number of strands you actually need for your pattern and double the length. So, if you are supposed to use 10inches and 2 strands, measure 20inches and 1 strand.

Then fold the measured thread into equal halves, which should give you two ends, and thread both ends into your needle.

Step 2: Set the loop

Once your needle is threaded, pull the side with the ends till the other end is longer, where there should be a fold that would serve as the loop.

When you have your loop, take your needle from back to front and create the first half of the cross stitch. Don’t tug all the thread out, you can remain a few inches of the folded part (the loop) to hang at the back.

Step 3: Complete knotless start and continue the stitch

Use your needle to complete that first stitch and return to the back. Pass the needle through the loop and pull the thread till it’s taut. You can test out the firmness and simply continue stitching with a secure, knot-free start.

Method 2: Temporary Knots

Yes, it does sound a bit back and forth to say you can start a cross stitch without a knot and then recommend temporary knots. But it works out nicely in the end, and you’ll see so yourself when you try out this method.

A temporary knot helps you secure the start of your threadwork, without the risks of the thread pulling through while you work. It can be done in two (2) knot styles; Away Knot and Waste Knot.

Away Knot

Step 1: Form away knot

Count out your thread and include a few extra inches for the away knot tail. Go on and create the preferred knot style at the end of your thread after threading your needle.

Step 2: Site the away knot

Place the knot (away knot) about 3-5 inches off the area where your stitch or embroidery is going to start. Once you have the away knot sited, with the extra inches for the tail, you can begin to create your threadwork pattern.

While working on your design, remain conscious about the tail to avoid getting it caught up in your stitches.

Step 3: Clip knot

When you have completed the pattern you are working on, it is time to clip the knot. Carefully clip the away knot and use the tail left behind to thread your needle. Using the newly threaded needle, weave through the backside stitches on the fabric.

There is no specified method for weaving the tail of an away knot so you can do it in the same way as the tail at the end of a thread. Once the tail is weaved and secured, your threadwork will be flawless.

This temporary knot style to secure and start a cross stitch works quite well with other embroidery stitch styles, especially when working with an uneven strand count. Although, it uses more thread inches than the traditional knot methods. So, if you are using an expensive brand or line of threads, you may want to use a different knotless method of stitching that uses fewer threads.

Waste Knot

Step 1: Form waste knot

Add a few inches to the measurement for your thread before cutting from the pile. Thread your needle and create a knot at the end of your thread.

Step 2: Set the tail

On the front of the fabric, insert your needle a few inches from the start of your threadwork so that the waste knot is placed on that side. After placing the waste knot on the front of the fabric, pull the tail at the back of the fabric and set it aside for the threadwork.

Step 3: Secure threadwork and clip waste knot

Start your threadwork over the tail on the backside of the fabric. You will notice that, while you work, the knot gets covered and the tail gets secured.

Once the threadwork has sufficiently covered and secured the tail of the waste knot, you can carefully trim the waste knot away and continue stitching.

Alternative to Step 1 and 2: For a buried thread style

To cross stitch without a knot using the buried thread method, you use similar steps as the waste knot style, with an exception to the first and second steps.

Instead of forming a knot as you would for the waste knot, you simply have to start your stitch without any form of knot but leave enough inches for the tail.

In ‘Step 2’ rather than start stitching from the front, a few inches from the start of your thread work, you can leave the thread’s tail at the backside of the fabric.

Pick up and cover the tail as you do your main threadwork on the front of the fabric. Once the tail is secured, clip as you would for a waste knot and continue the project.

It is important to note that this style of a temporary knot is ideal for stitch styles that cover the tail while stitching, like a cross stitch. Another stitch style that works well for a waste knot is the satin stitch because it also crosses the tail on the backside.

How To Start A Cross Stitch With Buried Thread

To cross stitch without a knot using the buried thread method, you use similar steps as the waste knot style, with an exception to the first and second steps.

Instead of forming a knot as you would for the waste knot, you simply have to start your stitch without any form of knot but leave enough inches for the tail.

In ‘Step 2’ rather than start stitching from the front, a few inches from the start of your thread work, you can leave the thread’s tail at the backside of the fabric.

Pick up and cover the tail as you do your main threadwork on the front of the fabric. Once the tail is secured, clip as you would for a waste knot and continue the project.

How To End A Cross Stitch Without A Knot

Now that you know how to start a cross stitch without a knot, using two different methods, you can’t be left stranded at the end!

To end a cross stitch without making a knot, start by completing the last stitch. Once the final X cross stitch is done, use the threaded needle to get to the back of the fabric right where the last stitch is sited.

Pass the needle across some of the last few stitches, making sure not to disrupt the pattern on the front of the fabric. And keep running the needle till you are confident of the firmness, but be sure not to pass it more than a few times.

When your cross stitch project is all set and secured, clip the excess thread.

Jessica

Hello, I am Jessica Flores, and you are welcome to my website. I am a professional fashion designer and a seamstress. I always carried a passion for craftwork. My love for craft grew along with time. I have spent years researching and practicing in this field to gather colossal experience.

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